Why is Samsung Renaming its 3 nm Tech to 2 nm Process Node

By using the more impressive-sounding "2nm" label, Samsung can potentially position itself as a leader in chip manufacturing and compete more effectively with companies like Intel, which is also offering a "2nm" process (Intel 20A).

Introduction:

In a significant move that underscores its commitment to technological advancement, Samsung electronics has announced a strategic renaming of its cutting-edge chip processes. Originally introduced as the 2nd generation 3-nano process, Samsung has decided to officially rebrand it as the 2nm chip process.

This decision comes after the initial shift from 3-nano to 2-nano at the beginning of the year. The move aligns with Samsung’s pursuit of innovation and its continuous efforts to stay at the forefront of semiconductor technology.

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Background:

Samsung Electronics embarked on the production of 3-nano chips utilizing the groundbreaking gate-all-around (GAA) process, marking a significant milestone in semiconductor manufacturing.

Samsung Process node

The company initiated mass production of these chips in June 2022. Building on this success, Samsung aims to scale up its production capabilities by introducing the second-generation 3-nano process this year and the 2nm process in 2025.

Name Transition:

The transition from 2nd generation 3-nano to 2-nano and subsequently to 2nm signifies. It is not just a nomenclature change but a progression in technological precision.

The decision to adopt the 2nm designation underscores Samsung’s confidence in its advanced manufacturing capabilities and its intent to communicate a more accurate representation of the chip’s nanometer scale.

  • Marketing: It’s speculated that the primary reason is for marketing purposes. By using the more impressive-sounding “2nm” label, Samsung can potentially position itself as a leader in chip manufacturing and compete more effectively with companies like Intel, which is also offering a “2nm” process (Intel 20A).
  • Simplification: Another possibility is that Samsung is aiming to simplify its process nomenclature. Having multiple generations of a 3nm process could be confusing, and switching to “2nm”. It creates a clearer distinction from the first-generation 3nm process.

Mass Production Plans:

Samsung Electronics will start making 2nm chips in the second half of this year using the 2nm process.

This accelerated timeline reflects the company’s dedication to meeting the growing demand for high-performance semiconductor solutions.

Mass production of 2nm chips will usher in a new era of computing power, efficiency, and functionality.

Industry Collaboration:

Samsung’s commitment to innovation has garnered attention from industry players, as evidenced by a recent order for a 2nm process AI accelerator chip from Japanese AI startup PFN.

This collaboration highlights the broader implications of Samsung’s technological advancements. It is extending beyond its product portfolio to impact diverse sectors such as artificial intelligence.

Fabless Industry Perspective:

An official within the fabless industry has confirmed the rebranding of the 2nd generation 3-nano technology to the 2nm technology.

The industry insider emphasized that the contractual agreements with Samsung Electronics were also updated to reflect this change.

This move is not merely cosmetic; it reaffirms Samsung’s dedication to pushing the boundaries of semiconductor technology.

Conclusion:

Samsung Electronics’ decision to rename its 2nd generation 3-nano process to the 2nm process marks a pivotal moment in the semiconductor industry.

This shift reflects not only a name change but a technological evolution, emphasizing Samsung’s commitment to staying at the forefront of innovation.

As the company prepares for the mass production of 2nm chips, the implications for computing power, efficiency, and broader industry collaborations are poised to reshape the landscape of semiconductor technology.

Stay tuned as Samsung continues to redefine the future of nanometer-scale chip processes.

Editorial Team
Editorial Team
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